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ESIS TC15: Structural Integrity of Additively Manufactured Components

TC 15 Committee
Structural Integrity of Additively Manufactured Components

 

Chairs

Filippo Berto

NTNU, Department of Engineering Design and Materials

filippo.berto@ntnu.no

Luca Susmel

University of Sheffield

l.susmel@sheffield.ac.uk

 

 
International Advisory Board of TC 15

 

Wei Cai 

Stanford University, USA

caiwei@stanford.edu

Keith Chan 

Hong Kong Polytechnic

kc.chan@polyu.edu.hk

Chiara Daraio 

Caltech University 

daraio@caltech.edu

Ali Fatemi 

The University of Toledo

ali.fatemi@utoledo.edu

John Hutchinson 

Harvard University

jhutchin@fas.harvard.edu

Rys Jones

Monash University

rhys.jones@monash.edu

Takayuki Kitamura

Kyoto University

kitamura@kues.kyoto-u.ac.jp

Adrian Lew

Stanford University, USA

lewa@stanford.edu

Hisao Matsunaga

Kyushu University

matsunaga.hisao.964@m.kyushu-u.ac.jp

Yukitaka Murakami

Kyushu University

murakami.yukitaka.600@m.kyushu-u.ac.jp

James Palko

UC Merced, USA

jpalko@ucmerced.edu

Robert Ritchie

Berkeley University

ritchie@berkeley.edu

Nima Shamsaei, PhD
Associate Professor

Auburn University

shamsaei@auburn.edu

Zhigang Suo

Harvard University

suo@seas.harvard.edu

Jan Torgersen 

NTNU Trondheim/Stanford University

jan.torgersen@ntnu.no

 

European Advisory Board of TC 15
Donka Angelova

University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, Bulgaria,

donka@uctm.edu

Matteo Benedetti

University of Trento, Italy

matteo.benedetti@unitn.it

Catrin Davies

Imperial College, UK

catrin.davies@imperial.ac.uk

Manuel De Freitas

University of Lisbon, Portugal

mfreitas@dem.ist.utl.pt

Marisa Di Sabatino

Norwegian University of Science and Technology

marisa.di.sabatino.lundberg@ntnu.no

Mohamed Elmansori

Ecole Nationale Supérieure d'Arts et Métiers

mohamed.elmansori@ensam.eu

Paolo Ermanni

ETH Zurich

permanni@ethz.ch

Omar Fergani

NTNU Norway

o.fergani@ntnu.no

Emmanuel Gdoutos

Democritus University of Thrace

egdoutos@civil.duth.gr

Paul Hooper Imperial College, UK

paul.hooper@imperial.ac.uk

Odd Hopperstad

Norwegian University of Science and Technology

odd.hopperstad@ntnu.no

Francesco Iacoviello 

Università di Cassino  

francesco.iacoviello@gmail.com

Paolo Ferro

University of Padua

ferro@gest.unipd.it

Paul Mayrhofer 

paul.mayrhofer@tuwien.ac.at

TU Wien

Alexander Korsunsky 

University of Oxford 

alexander.korsunsky@eng.ox.ac.uk

Tadeusz Lagoda

Opole University Poland

t.lagoda@po.opole.pl

Dennis Kochmann

ETH Zurich

kochmann@caltech.edu

Liviu Marsavina

University of Timisoara

liviu.marsavina@upt.ro

Alfredo Navarro

University of Sevilla

navarro@us.es

Aleksander Ovsianikov

TU Wien, Austria

aleksandr.ovsianikov@tuwien.ac.at

Brecht Van Hooreweder

KU Leuven,  Belgium

brecht.vanhooreweder@kuleuven.be

Thierry Palin-Luc

Université de Bordeaux, Arts et Métiers ParisTech, Bordeaux INP, INRA

thierry.palin-luc@ensam.eu

Jamie Paik 

École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne 

jamie.paik@epfl.ch

Heikki Remes

Aalto University

heikki.remes@aalto.fi

Jani Romanoff

Aalto University

jani.romanoff@aalto.fi

 Andrzej Seweryn 

a.seweryn@pb.edu.pl

Dziekan Wydziału Mechanicznego Politechniki Białostockiej

Ian Sinclair 

University of Southampton

i.sinclair@soton.ac.uk 

Antonio Alvaro

Research scientist

Materials Integrity and Welding, SINTEF Materials and Chemistry

Mobile: +47 96 73 84 51

Shoufeng Yang

KUleuven

shoufeng.yang@kuleuven.be

Michael Vormwald

Technische Universität of Darmstadt

vormwald@wm.tu-darmstadt.de


SUMMARY

Additive manufacturing (AM) techniques offer the potential to economically fabricate customized parts with complex geometries in a rapid design-to-manufacture cycle. However, the basic understanding of the mechanical and functional behaviour of these materials must be substantially improved at all scale levels before the benefits of this rapidly developing technology can be utilized for critical load bearing applications. This advancement requires to match different competences combining both manufacturing processes and advanced design methodologies. For airframe and ground vehicle applications, developing a better understanding of fatigue performance is the key. Due to the novelty of this technology, a very limited literature exists on the stuctural integrity of AM materials. In particular, the physical phenomena linked to fracture and fatigue crack initiation and propagation in AM materials have not been investigated properly and no standards and recommendations are available up to now. Both theoretical understanding and structural applications are especially affected by this tremendous limitation. Hence, to achieve a better understanding of the basic physiscs phenomena and to provide effective criteria for the design would be crucial for significant advances in automotive, aerospace, and biomedical which are key sectors for this process that has an important impact on many potential end-users. These advances in knowledge will open the doors for newer designs; cleaner, lighter, and safer products; shorter lead times; and lower costs. The ambitious and challenging objectives of this Technical Committee will be achieved by building an international team having the required expertise in the field.

 

Potential topics on additive manufacturing

• Influence of the additive manufacturing process signature on microstructure;
• Fatigue and crack propagation in additive manufactured parts;
• Fatigue behavior of lattice structures;
• Residual stress measurement in additive manufactured parts;
• Smart implants for biomedical applications;
• Characterization of mechanical properties in additive manufacturing;
• Development of shock absorbing protection made of crushable materials (lattice cellular structure) using Additive Manufacturing;
• Development of one single part integrating waveguide filter, bends, couplers, supporting structures made by Additive Manufacturing;
• Development of embedded thermal functions in structural parts using 3D printing;
• New generation of prosthetics (complex reticular shapes and multi-material, functionally graded structures);
• Lattice Structures for Launchers and Spacecraft Produced with Automatic Processes;
• Hybrid processes for advanced additive manufacturing components;
• Optimization of the functional mechanical/surface behavior at micro and nano scale levels;
• High strain rate and impact behavior of additively manufacturing materials;
• Advanced titanium and aluminum alloys tailored for Additive Manufacturing space applications;
• Development of very large 3D printed structures;
• Development of a manufacturing process for large polymer structures;
• Robotic Origamis and functional robots constructed from smart materials;
• Micro and nano joints of additively manufactured parts obtained by using Hybrid Metal Extrusion Bonding;
• Advanced thermal models for microstructure optimization in powder based additive manufacturing processes;
• The semiconductors industry uses high purity silicon, which then is solidified in a regular geometry, called ingot, and then saw/cut this into thin slices, called wafers. During the sawing process, about 50% of the material (silicon) is lost as kerf. If we directly produce thin slices, it would have a huge economical advantage;
• Another topic is to look at possibilities to use AM for roof tiles where we combine both a protective solid material with solar cells integrated in the roof tile. 

 

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